Mariculture Importance

According to industry forecasts, rising demand and human population growth will result in the increase in fish production to 162 million tons a year by 2020 in order to maintain the same supply of fish as in the past few years. The only way to boost production is through mariculture 

For decades, the fishing industry has developed and its scale has grown steadily. However, the main traditional fishing grounds peaked 40 years ago. In recent decades, global fish production of some species, such as tuna, swordfish, cod, and halibut has crashed by up to 90%. This collapse is mainly due to increased fishing, uncontrolled fishing, including by commercial fishing methods, human natural population growth, and pollution.

 

As sea fishing declined, aquaculture developed to offer a quick response to growing demand for fish, with the result that global fish production has steadily increased over the past five decades, but its impact on the environment and the quality of fish has been dramatic. 

 

According to industry forecasts, rising demand and human population growth will result in the increase in fish production to 162 million tons a year by 2020 in order to maintain the same supply of fish as in the past few years. The only way to boost production is through aquaculture, specifically mariculture, because fishing has already reached its maximum output. 

 

A special study by the FAO, the World Bank, and the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), as part of the policy document Fish to 2030, projects that aquaculture will provide 50% of global fish production by 2015 and that the proportion will rise to 66% by 2030. The growth will be due to rising demand for fish, especially in China and emerging markets on one hand, and the plunge in the supply of fish from free fishing on the other hand. 

 

Industry forecasts and studies state that there is a real need for the development of a global mariculture industry. Experts estimate that mariculture, if development and promoted responsibly, including the development of ability to raise fish at sea, can greatly contribute to achieving global food security.