Global Fish Industry Overview

The importance of fish consumption is growing in view of the worsening shortage of animal protein caused by plagues and diseases which have broken out among animals that provide humans with protein. Other reasons that greatly affect the importance of fish consumption are the sharp rise in the cost of inputs and the severe shortage of critical resources

The importance of fish consumption is growing in view of the worsening shortage of animal protein caused by plagues and diseases which have broken out among animals that provide humans with protein. Other reasons that greatly affect the importance of fish consumption are the sharp rise in the cost of inputs and the severe shortage of critical resources, such as land, feed, power, diesel, water, as well as the shortage/rising costs of animal feed crops.

 

The FAO study found that fish are the most common commodity in the global food market, with a turnover of $130 billion in 2012. Global fish consumption is steadily rising, at an annual growth rate of 7% over the past decade. 

 

The global production of sea fish was 158 million tons in 2012, of which 91.3 million tons came from fishing and 66.6 million tons from aquaculture. Most aquaculture production is located in fresh water, and a small portion is in seawater or brackish water. 

 

An FAO study indicates that the raising of fish at sea (mariculture) has been steadily increasing since the 1980s, amounting to 65 million tons worldwide in 2012. Most of the fish raised are specific species, such as Atlantic salmon, trout, and grouper.

 

Industry forecasts and studies state that there is a real need for the development of a global mariculture industry. Experts estimate that mariculture, if development and promoted responsibly, including the development of ability to raise fish at sea, can greatly contribute to achieving global food security.